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New Years Resolutions for Doctors and Patients

Below is an updated re-post of a blog from a few years ago.  I liked it then and I like it now.


#1 Doctor: Resolve to let patient speak without interruption and describe their symptoms.
Patient: Resolve to focus on the problem I am seeing the doctor about and not come with a list of 10 complaints for a 15 minute visit.

#2 Doctor: Resolve to keep a pleasant tone of voice when answering night and weekend calls from the answering service, patients or nurses.
Patient: Resolve to get my prescriptions filled during office hours, not forget my medications while traveling and to use nights and weekend phone calls for emergencies only.

#3 Doctor:
Resolve to exercise a minimum of 4 times a week for better health.
Patient: Ditto

#4 Doctor: Resolve to train my staff and model excellent customer service for patients.
Patient:
Resolve to understand that getting an instant referral, prescription, note for jury duty, letter to my insurance from the doctor is not my god-given right and I will stop bitching if it doesn't happen the day I request it.

#5 Doctor: Resolve to give at least one compliment a day to my office staff, child and spouse.
Patient: Ditto

#6 Doctor: Resolve to apologize when I am late seeing a patient who has been waiting.
Patient: Resolve to understand that when the doctor is late  another human being needed attention. It might me me in the future who needs extra time.

#7 Doctor: Resolve to do one new thing a month that is novel. ( a play? travel? special activity with a child or spouse? computer skill? music? see a friend?)
Patient: Ditto

#8 Doctor: Resolve to review all insurance payers and drop contracts that are not paying market rates for my skills and education. I will not go bankrupt.
Patient: Resolve to try and understand the medical economics that require my doctor to drop my insurance. If my doctor isn't worth paying a little more for the visit I will find a new doctor.

#9 Doctor: Resolve for each new prescription I write I will explain 5 things. The name of the medication. The reason for the medication. The side effects. How to take it. And how long to take it.
Patient: Once the doctor has prescribed a medication, I will take it as prescribed or let the doctor know right away if I am stopping it.

#10 Doctor: I will give thanks that I have a wonderful profession where I can help people in a special way.
Patient: I will not underestimate the many years of training and sacrifice my doctors have gone through and I will appreciate that they are trying their hardest to help me stay healthy.

Comments

Online casino said…
The reason for the medication. The side effects. How to take it. And how long to take it.These all things are great to know about it.
CaShThoMa said…
Amen to all. Well said. Worthy of posting year after year!
Dr Paula said…
Thank you for this wonderful reminder and for all the time you take to create this insightful and entertaining blog. Happy New Year everyone.
Anonymous said…
11. Additionaly for both Doctor and Patient be honest and straight foreword with each other. It makes all the difference in the world in a trusting,and respectful bond with better communication verses a relationship that is lacking experiencing these critical valued qualities. Always an Important factor in establishing working together as a productive partnership team towards accomplishing personal health goals.

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