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Smarter Medical Care


The internet is a wonderful place to get medical information when and how you want it.  You may not be interested in the topic of "Coumadin" until you or a family member is prescribed the drug.  What does it mean when your father tells you his doctor wants to do a "laparoscopy" or that your mother has a "venous thrombosis"?  It is important to get your medical information from a reputable source that is not filled with advertisements and gimmicks.  That is why I recommend Smarter Medical Care.

Smarter Medical Care was started by a San Francisco Hematologist named Dr. Robert Rodvien in memory of his wife, Rayna, who died of ovarian cancer.  It contains over 65 podcasts dedicated to patient information that is easy to digest and free of commercial bias.  It is an easy site to navigate and it addresses medical topics directly and compassionately.


Smarter Medical Care is a good site to bookmark and come back to when questions need answering.  So far Dr. Rodvien is supporting it himself and is about $80K  in the red.  Hopefully it will find a home that can monetize it and keep it going.

Comments

KM said…
Sounds like a great site, thanks for this info. I usually use Mayo Clinic as the main one and it good to get other crediable sources.
Agree that information is power. Caution advised on reliability of internet derived medical information. It's full of misinformation and veiled advertising. Caveat emptor!
Anonymous said…
Which is why we need credible recommendations from MDs, ie, Dr Brayer and Smarter Medical Care. Thank you both, M
DrPaula said…
Thank you for this good source of information. I will pass it on to my patients.
abendkleider said…
It contains over 65 podcasts dedicated to patient information that is easy to digest and free of commercial bias. It is an easy site to navigate and it addresses.
linkwheel said…
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