Skip to main content

NSAIDS May Increase Risk of Miscarriage

A new study of more than 52,000 pregnant women in Canada shows that miscarriage rates were more than twice as high for women who took a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) compared to women who did not.  The study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal reported that women who used prescription NSAIDS for just 4 days during early pregnancy had an increased risk for miscarriage.

These medications are commonly prescribed for pain,  cramps, headaches and fever and can be bought over the counter as Advil, Aleeve or Ibuprofen.  We have thought they were safe in early pregnancy but this study shows that may not be the case.   Of the women who filled a prescription for an NSAID in early pregnancy, 7.5% suffered a miscarriage compared to 2.6% of those who did not fill a prescription.  Prescriptions filled were Diclofenac, Naprosyn, Celebrex and Ibuprofen.  The researchers controlled for other miscarriage risks like diabetes, depression, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and untreated thyroid disease.

One problem with the study is that it only looked at prescription NSAIDs and women who were taking over-the-counter NSAIDs might not have been counted.  Also, filling a prescription does not mean the woman took the drug.  They also noted that about 15% of the women who did not have miscarriages got prescriptions for anti-nausea drugs, compared to about 3% of the women who miscarried.  It appears that morning sickness protects against miscarriage.  Or the drug that treats morning sickness is protective.

So what is a woman to do?  First of all, if you are pregnant and have taken an NSAID, don't worry.  This study was not perfectly done and there may have been other factors involved besides NSAIDs.  (The miscarriage group had higher rates of anxiety and depression).   Also the odds of having a healthy baby were far greater than a miscarriage.

If a woman is not yet pregnant, she would be advised to take Tylenol (acetaminophen) for pain relief instead of a NSAID.

Comments

Anonymous said…
many drugs might have same effects on pregnant women.

this can only be known when such incidents happen as no drug can be tried (in trials) on pregnant owmen



drug information blog
Anonymous said…
Thank you for this important information. This is why I read your blog. It truly does keep us updated on the latest research without the hype. I trust you.
India Report said…
http://www.indiareport.com/India-usa-uk-news/latest-news/1084578/FeaturedArticles/14/54/14

Teens get pregnant during spring -----
Home - Check said…
Ideal first step for women having difficulty falling pregnant test can be done in the privacy of your home with Ovulation Kit just type in Google home check Ovulation Kit then
Plan your pregnancy as you like you can now choose your time and date of pregnancy

Popular posts from this blog

scintillating scotoma

Nothing like experiencing a medical condition first-hand to really help a doctor understand it from the patient's point of view.  After all these years, I had my first (and hopefully last) scintillating scotoma while sitting on the couch playing "words with friends" on my ipad and watching TV.  A scotoma is a partial loss of vision in a normal visual field.  Scintillate is flashing, sparkles.  Put them together and you have moving, flashing sparkles with a blind spot in your eyes.

This visual aura was first described in the 19th century  by a Dr. Hubert Airy who had migraine headaches.  The visual sparks and flashes are in a zig-zag pattern and they can precede a migraine headache or occur without any pain.   The scotoma affects both eyes and closing one or the other does not make it go away.  Sometimes the term "ocular migraine" or "retinal migraine"  are used to describe this phenomenon but these involve only one eye, not both.  The terms are often …

Do Doctors Make Too Much Money?

An article in theNew York Times says the reason health care costs are so high in the United States is because doctors are paid too much. I saw that and my eyes bugged out. I just came home from a meeting with physicians and hospital administrators and the entire meeting was spent discussing the financial challenges physicians face in keeping their doors open to see patients. The goal of this meeting was to keep health services in that community so patients will have someone to care for them. Not a person in the room would agree that the doctors earn too much.

Physicians paid too much? Lets break that down. A doctor spends a minimum of 11 years in education and training after the age of 18. Many are in training for 15 or more years. They are living on student loans and contributing zero to their family's income until the residency years. At that time they earn less than minimum wage if you factor in the 80-100 hour workweek. When a doctor emerges from training (and believe me…

Why Are Doctor Bills So High?

Who hasn't wondered why doctors need to charge so darn much for an office visit? If you have insurance and bother to look at what the insurance company pays, it is always much lower than the charge. Why does medical care cost so much? Is the doctor gouging? One of the best explanations I have seen is stolen from another blog. I would like to give credit but all I know is the name Dr. Adam. He shows this letter to his patients:

Why are doctors' bills so high?

Over the past few years several patients have asked this question. It is a very good question that needs to be answered in the context of our current health care system.
When I was growing up and went to my family doctor, my parents or I paid around $10 for a typical minor problem visit (in 1966). With inflation, that would be around $62 today (in 2006 dollars) (http://www.westegg.com/inflation). Today Medicare reimburses me approximately $33 to $45 for a similar patient visit. When I was a teenager the overhead costs of…